Archives for 

Mick McCarthy

Ireland Manager: Mark ’02

With the news that the FAI plan to bide their time with the appointment of a new manager, we’re likely to see some new names enter the race. The last Irish squad to qualify for a World Cup could yet prove a breeding ground for future coaches of the national team. With many of the class of ’02 dipping their toes in the management waters, and the two main protagonists Mick McCarthy and Roy Keane among the contenders to succeed Giovanni Trapattoni, Diarmuid o hAinle looks at alternatives to the seemingly manager-elect Martin O’Neill. Continue reading →

It Started With a Handshake

Review: Mick McCarthy took over at Ipswich Town last week and confirmed he would have said yes to a return to the Ireland job. His arrival at Portman Road drew the inevitable links to Roy Keane’s time in charge of the Tractor Boys. For Irish people, one name usually follows the other and the word Saipan is never far from the lips. Diarmuid O hAinle’s stunning new book It Started With a Handshake takes us back to 2002 but asks what if it had all turned out differently? Continue reading →

“You Can Flick Your World Cup”

It was the hand-shake that tremored around the world. Now two giants of Irish football have been reduced to miniature. To celebrate Diarmuid O’hAinle’s stunning book on arguably the national team’s most momentous period, the 2001 Lansdowne Road embrace between Mick McCarthy and Roy Keane has been depicted in Subbuteo form. Continue reading →

How Mick McCarthy Made Fergie

On this day in 1986: Mick McCarthy scored the equaliser in the first televised Manchester derby. The result saw Ron Atkinson sacked as United manager soon after paving the way for a certain young Scot named Alex Ferguson to take over on November 6th. The combination of cameras at the ground and the paranoia about travel chaos owing to the first day of bus de-regulation in the city resulted in a sub-40,000 attendance (at the time, the lowest ever at Maine Road). City were relegated at the end of the season. #Knowledge Continue reading →

Euro 88 – Where Are They Now?

They were the pioneers. After decades of heartache, the Republic of Ireland appeared at a major football finals for the first time in 1988. Twenty-four years on, we’re back, but many of Jack’s original Boys in Green can still be seen on our TV screens as pundits. Póg Mo Goal takes an offside look back and asks; the heroes of Euro ’88, where are they now? Continue reading →

The Saipan Incident – Part 4

With the tenth anniversary of Irish football’s civil war upon us, Póg Mo Goal brings you Part 4, the penultimate extract from John Kiberd’s astonishing body of work on the subject, focusing on the fall-out and player’s reaction from Keane’s infamous tirade. This is the Saipan Incident. Continue reading →

The Saipan Incident – Part 3

With the tenth anniversary of Irish football’s civil war upon us, Póg Mo Goal brings you Part 3 of our extracts from John Kiberd’s astonishing body of work on the subject, focusing on the timeline of events in the build-up to the confrontation. This is the Saipan Incident, the Countdown to Meltdown. Continue reading →

The Saipan Incident – Part 2

With the tenth anniversary of Irish football’s civil war upon us, Póg Mo Goal brings you Part 2 of our extracts from John Kiberd’s astonishing body of work on the subject, focusing on the history of communication issues between Roy Keane and Mick McCarthy. This is ‘The Saipan Incident’. Continue reading →

“I’ll pop up again somewhere lad don’t worry” – ‘Merlin’ Mick Moves on

“I’m not Merlin the Magician,” – Mick McCarthy’s first words to the media as Wolves’ new manager back in summer 2006. In the intervening five-and-3/4 seasons; he has regularly been serenaded with chants of ”Super Mick, Super Mick, Super Mick McCarthy” and eventually was dubbed ”Merlin Mick,” the magician who changed around the fortunes of Wolverhampton Wanderers Football Club. Continue reading →

Preview: I’m Having Ya Macedonia

  An infamous night in Skopje. Not so much a tangerine dream as an orange nightmare. In 1997 Mick McCarthy’s hopes of emulating Jack Charlton by leading the Republic to a World Cup finals disintegrated when an ageing Irish side fell to a disastrous 3-2 balls-up in the Balkans. A team that included a forward-line […] Continue reading →